Patent: Slide-to-read

I was notified just recently of a recently awarded US patent on which I worked. The patent entitled, “Method for increased accessibility to a human machine interface,” was awarded about a month ago. We commonly call this accessibility feature “Slide-to-read.” The patent abstract reads:

A method is defined for providing an individual increased accessibility to a touch screen displaying first and second elements. The individual initially engages the touch screen with a contact point at a first location. The contact point is dragged across the touch screen into engagement with the first element and the first element is highlighted in response thereto. Thereafter, the individual may drag the contact point across the touch screen from the first element into engagement with the second element whereby the second element is highlighted on the touch screen and the highlight is removed from the first element. Audible announcements may accompany the contacting of the first or second elements with the contact point.

Figure from patent.
How slide-to-read works (from US Patent 8,760,421).

Patent language is kind of a language of its own, so here is what it really means…

In layman’s terms

Slide-to-read allows a person to get speech output for anything on the screen over which he or she drags a finger. This is very useful for people who have low vision or who cannot read some or all of the words on the display.

To use slide-to-read, the user must touch the screen and slide a finger into any other element on the screen. That other element and any subsequent element that the user touches while dragging are read out loud with text-to-speech. A visible focus highlight follows the user’s finger so that users know what item is being read. When the finger is lifted, the focus highlight stays on the last-touched item, so that the user can easily find that element to activate it. If the user taps the screen or does not drag into a different element, the system works as normal (e.g., activates a touchscreen button).

This invention is a new feature for EZ Access, which is a set of cross-disability access techniques that can be used on electronic devices, particularly for information and transaction kiosks. The EZ Access techniques were created by the Trace Research & Development Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. While intended for use with EZ Access, the invention does not require EZ Access. Note that slide-to-read is a particular solution for people who cannot read text on a touchscreen. As a single-finger sliding gesture, it may conflict with panning and scrolling gestures that are used in some touchscreen systems. This is not typically an issue with kiosk systems where screens are designed for simplicity and ease of use.

Reference

Jordan, J. B., Vanderheiden, G. C., Kelso, D. P. (2014) Method For Increased Accessibility To A Human Machine Interface. US Patent 8,760,421


About J. Bern Jordan

Bern is a Ph.D. candidate and researcher in accessibility, usability, user interface, and technology interested in extending usability to all people, including people with disabilities and those who are aging. He currently works at the Trace R&D Center in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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